US broadcasters on how Iraqis hear the news

At First Monday Forum on July 11, Gallup's senior analyst Mohamed Younis observes as Diana Turecek of Middle East Broadcasting Networks relates research about radio listening habits of audiences in Iraq.  The forum, held at the American Foreign Service Association in Washington, DC, is cosponsored by the Public Diplomacy Council in partnership with the USC Annenberg Center on Communication Leadership & Policy Washington D.C. office and the USC Center on Public Diplomacy.

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PD commentary

Selection and commentary by PDC members and authoritative experts in the field

Quotable: Kristin Colley on U.S. strategic communication in the urbanized, littoral, and connected world of the future

Wednesday, July 27th 2016

Less than two decades from now, our nation’s adversaries “will be extensively electronically connected, able to communicate rapidly and securely via new apps. They will be able to instantly transfer money via phone, and control of the water and food supply lines into cities will allow them consistent access to capital. Additionally, they will be adept at using both traditional and social media to tell their stories and recruit support.”

 

This changed international environment will challenge the U.S. Marine Corps, wrote Marine Corps information operations planner Captain Kristin Sproat Colley in a deep and searching article, “Combined Arms Effects: Adapting our thinking for the Information Age and urban littorals” in the July, 2016, issue of Marine Corps Gazette.  It should be rocketing around the world of Public Diplomacy, foreign policy, and national security.  “As is currently the case with the Islamic State, [adversaries] will each promise a solution (individual, national, or international) to the ills of society. The U.S., as the dominant face of Western culture, diplomacy, economics, and imperialism, will naturally continue to be a unifying target, as will her allied governments. They will not fight our technical superiority but our weaknesses in strategic communications and outdated tactics.”

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

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Author: Donald M. Bishop

Quotable: Blackwill and Tellis on PRC views of democracy

Wednesday, July 27th 2016

Looking back at the March, 2015, report issued by the Council on Foreign Relations, “Revising U.S. Grand Strategy Toward China,” there was no mention of Public Diplomacy.  The report’s authors, Robert D. Blackwill and Ashley J. Tellis, did mention a role for military exchanges – but as measures to strengthen U.S. relations with nations on China’s periphery.  Nonetheless, Public Diplomacy specialists should be interested in the section of the report that touches on social control, perceptions of threat from American democracy and rule of law programs, and domestic propaganda.

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

Quotable: Darczewska and Zochowski on “Russophobia in the Kremlin’s strategy”

Sunday, July 17th 2016

The Polish scholars Jolanta Darczewska and Piotr Żochowski focused on an underlying theme in Russia’s propaganda – traditional concepts of “Russophobia,” with its connections to chauvinism, conflicts of values, shaping, isolationism, stigmatizing, intolerance, rhetoric, and domestic mobilization.

 

Their analysis – “Russophobia in the Kremlin’s strategy: A Weapon of Mass Destruction” – appeared in the Points of View series published by the Centre for Eastern Studies (Ośrodek Studiów Wschodnich im. Marka Karpia – OSW) in Warsaw in October, 2015.  Here is the front summary of the paper’s theses:

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

Quotable: Amy Zalman on hybrid terrorists and the battle of ideas

Sunday, July 17th 2016

“Today, a hybrid type [of terrorist] appears to be evolving: someone who works without full organizational support or direction, but who is not working in total isolation from others.  We may call this the ‘hybrid’ or ‘networked’ terrorist, who may be or feel himself to be associated distantly with a group or an idea, but who may still carry out all or some of his activities without the direction of an organizational leader.” 

 

This concept was explored by Amy Zalman in an article, “Fighting Terrorists? Needed: More Effective Battle of Ideas,” that appeared on the website of The Globalist on July 17, 2016.  Zalman, a member of the Public Diplomacy Council, is the principal owner of the Strategic Narrative Institute LLC and adjunct Professor of Strategic Foresight Methods at Georgetown University.  For Public Diplomacy practitioners, her discussion of “global educational standards” is suggestive.  Here are some key points:

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

Quotable: Olidort and Sheff on textbooks that teach terror

Sunday, July 17th 2016

“IS textbooks and guidance literature promote an originalist, exclusivist Sunni identity and a Salafist interpretation of Islam . . . .  At the same time, many of these books attempt to indoctrinate readers with priorities and beliefs unique to IS: namely, an apocalyptic worldview and an emphasis on rebuilding the Caliphate, founding a Salafi Islamic state, and employing extreme violence.” 

 

This was one topic at a policy forum held by the Washington Institute for Near East Policy on July 13, 2016.  Key comments by Jacob Olidort of the Washington Institute and Marcus Sheff (the CEO of the Institute for Monitoring Peace and Cultural Tolerance in School Education [IMPACT-se] in Jerusalem) were summarized in an article on the Washington Institute’s website, “Teaching Terror: The Islamic State's Textbooks, Guidance Literature, and Indoctrination Methods” on July 15, 2016. The website also provides the full video.

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

The Public Diplomacy Council is a nonprofit organization committed to the academic study, professional practice, and responsible advocacy of public diplomacy. Founded in 1988, the Council serves the community of public diplomacy professionals, professors and students interested in public diplomacy.

 

 

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