Diplomacy and Media the topic of First Monday Forum with USC's Seib

USC Professor Philip Seib chats with PDC President Adam Clayton Powell III before Seib's talk "The Future of #Diplomacy" at the First Monday Forum on December 5 in Washington.  Prof. Seib discussed his new book by the same name, and how it relates to the upcoming Trump Administration.

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PD commentary

Selection and commentary by PDC members and authoritative experts in the field

Quotable: Courtney and Paul on Russia’s “firehose of falsehoods”

Sunday, September 11th 2016

The Kremlin's obsession with propaganda and disinformation persists even though it weakens Russia's attractiveness as a foreign policy and economic partner. America should seek to expose these nefarious methods and increase public resilience to their siren song, even as Washington pursues cooperation with Moscow on Syria and other issues. It is not enough to try to counter a firehose of falsehood with a squirt gun of truth.”

 

Headline:      Firehose of Falsehoods

 

Subhead:      Russian propaganda is pervasive, and America is behind the power curve in countering it.

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

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Author: Donald M. Bishop

Quotable: Kseniya Kirillova on Americans’ vulnerability to Russian propaganda

Sunday, September 11th 2016

Because of some of their unique national traits, quite a few Americans, including younger journalists unfamiliar with Soviet and Russian history, have fallen from time to time for propaganda and disinformation spread by the Kremlin on satellite television and social media. Some of it may be a result of unfamiliarity with foreign policy issues, but American distrust of authority also plays a role. Some Americans accept without questioning claims that Russia was until recently or still is an essentially democratic nation, now under threat from the West, and therefore must defend itself.  Kseniya Kirillova, a Russian journalist who studies these issues, explains why some Americans fall for such propaganda from the Kremlin. “Many Western journalists simply cannot conceive of the scope of lying in today’s Russian state media and continue to judge the information flowing out of Russia by the same criteria as information from any other source,” Kirillova wrote. [Front abstract]

 

Headline:      Why Americans Fall For Kremlin Propaganda

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

Quotable: Jay Wang on cultural relations in international affairs

Sunday, September 11th 2016

“. . . a crowded, fractured, and transparent information environment has become a part of our daily existence. Popular emotion and public opinion are exerting greater constraints on policies and state actions. The information cacophony in the digital space, with plenty of misinformation and disinformation, has exacerbated our incredulity and distrust. * * * I see culture and the arts as a moderating force, as they help to release some of the tensions in an evolving international order under great stress . . .”

 

Headline:      Cultural Relations: Moderating a Volatile World

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

Public Diplomacy: "Seen on the Web" (x)

Sunday, September 11th 2016

These are abbreviated references to articles "seen on the web" relating to public affairs, Public Diplomacy, international broadcasting, and information operations, provided in this format to allow searches on this PDC website.  They supplement the "Quotables" series.  These articles are from March, 2016.

 

 

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

What can Trump and Clinton learn from diplomats?

Friday, September 9th 2016

Donna Oglesby, Diplomat in Residence at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida, has published a book chapter just in time for this Presidential campaign.  Here is Donna's take on the value of diplomatic rhetoric.

 

"A community that believes understanding, informing, and influencing foreign publics and dialogue between Americans and United States’ institutions and their counterparts abroad is worthwhile is a community using and living within public, that is to say political, language.  Diplomats, above all are committed to the idea that contradictions in interests and values can often be worked out rationally, using language.  We believe that effective verbal and non-verbal language can lubricate the great and smaller gears enmeshing separated political communities into a single international system within which differences can be addressed without conflict.

"Given our understanding of political language as an instrument used to explain and persuade, what are we to make of this presidential election season, indeed, this year in global politics?  Like Alice in a strange new land, I feel the need to question the all-knowing Cheshire Cat: "what sort of people live about here?" to which the cat replies "in that direction lives a Hatter, and in that direction, lives a March Hare. Visit either you like: they're both mad!".

"Mad or not, their language defines the realm in which diplomats now work. Perhaps it’s time to take a longer look at Diplomatic Language. Join me in Chapter 20 of the new Sage Handbook of Diplomacy."

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Joe B. Johnson

Board member

 

Joe B. Johnson consults on government communication and technology after a career in the United States Foreign Service.  He is an instructor for the National Foreign Affairs Training Center, where he teaches strategic planning for public diplomacy.

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Author: Joe Johnson

The Public Diplomacy Council is a nonprofit organization committed to the academic study, professional practice, and responsible advocacy of public diplomacy. Founded in 1988, the Council serves the community of public diplomacy professionals, professors and students interested in public diplomacy.

 

 

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