New survey of U.S. public diplomacy released on eve of Presidential Inauguration

Dan Whitman (center) moderates the launch of the Council's book "Nontraditional U.S. Public Diplomacy: Past, Present and Future."  Deborah Trent, the editor, looks on from the left.  To Whitman's right are PDC Vice President Rob Albro, a chapter author, and Ambassador Cynthia Efird, PDC Board member, who commented on the book.  The venue was First Monday Forum, co-sponsored by the University of Southern California and the American Foreign Service Association.

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PD commentary

Selection and commentary by PDC members and authoritative experts in the field

Back to the 70s: a look at public diplomacy’s history

Friday, September 2nd 2016

Break out your bell-bottom jeans for the next First Monday Forum, our lunchtime panel discussion set for September 12.

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Joe B. Johnson

Board member

 

Joe B. Johnson consults on government communication and technology after a career in the United States Foreign Service.  He is an instructor for the National Foreign Affairs Training Center, where he teaches strategic planning for public diplomacy.

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Author: Joe Johnson

Quotable: Neil MacFarquhar profiles Russian disinformation

Monday, August 29th 2016

“With a vigorous national debate underway on whether Sweden should enter a military partnership with NATO, officials in Stockholm suddenly encountered an unsettling problem: a flood of distorted and outright false information on social media, confusing public perceptions of the issue.”  That was Neil MacFarquhar’s story lead.  How did it turn out?  Read his August 28, 2016, report, filed from Stockholm, “A Powerful Russian Weapon: The Spread of False Stories,” in The New York Times.  The entire story is worth reading; here are a few highlights:

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

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Author: Donald M. Bishop

Quotable: Nicole Hong on pushing back against ISIS social messaging

Monday, August 29th 2016

“After online efforts fizzle, government turns to encouraging others to join battle to counteract the terrorist group’s propaganda,” is the subhead of an August 28, 2016, article, “U.S. Revamps Line of Attack in Social-Media Fight Against Islamic State,” by Nicole Hong in The Wall Street Journal.  Her summary highlights the doctrinal shift – away from direct USG messaging toward working with partners.  Both the Department of State and the Department of Homeland Security are engaged.  This short gist necessarily omits many informative details, but here are some bullet points:

 

  • Recent initiatives by technology companies to push back against Islamic State’s social-media messaging highlight a sobering fact: The U.S. government’s battle on that front has mostly sputtered.
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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

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Author: Donald M. Bishop

Quotable: Sarah Sewall on Religious Extremism in Africa

Sunday, August 28th 2016

“. . . policymakers need to better understand both how religion affects issues of security and stability, and equally important, how to encourage and reinforce non-violent, tolerant expressions of faith,” said Sarah Sewall, Under Secretary of State for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights, in remarks – “Religious Extremism in Africa” -- at the Center for Strategic and International Security in Washington on August 1, 2016.  It’s an important speech. 

 

In the past, many Foreign Service Officers were uncomfortable discussing the religion factor in international affairs, citing “separation of church and state.”  Sewall made the case that while “the United States favors no particular faith,” and it must “reject framing the problem solely around religious ideology,” it must engage with religious communities and leaders.  Her speech elaborated how Public Diplomacy, development, and diplomacy work together to counter religiously-motivated violent extremism.  The full speech is worth reading, but here are some bullet points:

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

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Author: Donald M. Bishop

President Truman on “relief from lies and propaganda”

Sunday, August 28th 2016

President Truman on “relief from lies and propaganda”

Donald M. Bishop

 

Each presidential inaugural address provides a snapshot of underlying American ideals.  When they announce new policies, presidents characteristically appeal to enduring values.  As they begin new terms, presidents promise both change and continuity, so inaugural addresses always deserve careful reading. 

 

When reading any of the addresses from the past, imagine that you have travelled back in time and have become one of the President-elect’s or President’s advisors.  You’ve been asked to review the draft of the inaugural address with an eye for the president’s legacy -- whether it will ring tomorrow as well as today.  You have a blue pencil in your hand.  A paragraph you leave unmarked probably represents continuity; the address has expressed ideals that will still sound well in the twenty-first century.  Your edits, on the other hand, probably indicate change between those times and ours.

 

President Truman’s inaugural address of January 20, 1949, for instance, included these words.  Should any be changed?  Have we “moved” from “this faith”?

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

The Public Diplomacy Council is a nonprofit organization committed to the academic study, professional practice, and responsible advocacy of public diplomacy. Founded in 1988, the Council serves the community of public diplomacy professionals, professors and students interested in public diplomacy.

 

 

Upcoming

 

PDC/USC First Monday Forums

February 6, 2017 - "The Future of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty", with Thomas Kent, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty

March 6, 2017 - Using Soft Power for Canada's 150th Birthday

April 3, 2017 - "Trends in IR Curricula: Implications for Public Diplomacy" with a panel of deans including USC Annenberg's Ernest Wilson   

May 1, 2017 - Gary Knell, President and CEO, National Geographic Society

 

PDC Mentorship Lunch and Learn

February 8, 2017 - "Lunch with Deputy Spokesperson Mark Toner"

 

PDC Council Meetings

February 6, 2017, 10:00 - 11:30 am, at the American Foreign Service Association

Public Diplomacy Alumni Association

February 13, 2017 - Luncheon on Diplomacy in Space Exploration (see website for more)

 

 

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