Korea

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Public Diplomacy's Oral History Interviews

Sunday, July 30th 2017

Public Diplomacy’s Oral History Interviews

 

Donald M. Bishop

 

It’s a commonplace that most historical studies of U.S. public diplomacy have focused on Washington policies, themes, leaders, and decisions. 

 

They have thus slighted how policies were implemented “in the field” -- in other nations, regions, and societies.  There’s not much written on how Public Diplomacy officers at U.S. embassies, consulates, and American centers presented the United States to the people of other societies or how they advanced U.S. policies.

 

Those who want to gain insight into Public Diplomacy as it is implemented overseas will find a valuable resource in the extensive oral history program of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training.  ASDT’s offices are on the Arlington campus of the George Schultz National Foreign Affairs Training Center.  (In the State Department, the NFATC is usually called the Foreign Service Institute, FSI.)

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

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Author: Donald M. Bishop

Public Diplomacy’s Oral History Interviews

Monday, November 21st 2016

Public Diplomacy’s Oral History Interviews

 

Donald M. Bishop

 

It’s a commonplace that most historical studies of U.S. public diplomacy have focused on Washington policies, themes, leaders, and decisions. 

 

They have thus slighted how policies were implemented “in the field” -- in other nations, regions, and societies.  There’s not much written on how Public Diplomacy officers at U.S. embassies, consulates, and American centers presented the United States to the people of other societies or how they advanced U.S. policies.

 

Those who want to gain insight into Public Diplomacy as it is implemented overseas will find a valuable resource in the extensive oral history program of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training.  ASDT’s offices are on the Arlington campus of the George Schultz National Foreign Affairs Training Center.  (In the State Department, the NFATC is usually called the Foreign Service Institute, FSI.)

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One person has commented on this article so far

Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

Quotable: Bernard Lavin on Introducing Democratic Concepts to Korea

Sunday, December 7th 2014

He held senior Public Diplomacy positions in South Africa, Nigeria, and Indonesia too, but Bernard J. “Bernie” Lavin (1924-2002) would surely say his greatest contributions in the field of Public Diplomacy were in Korea. During his first tour in Seoul from 1957 to 1967, he focused on Korean education and the rising generation of students. He gave a brief account of one long-running program by the U.S. Information Service -- the introduction of democratic concepts in Korean education -- in his oral history interview with the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training (ADST) in 1988.

 

Organizing a program with comparable impact would be unlikely today. After the Korean War, Korea was open to new social concepts, and such moments are rare in any nation’s history. Then, one officer tended the program for the better part of a decade, giving it continuity and sustained focus. Now, every Public Diplomacy officer tends many portfolios, and the pace of both media and exchanges work is relentless. No post could now spare one of its officers for such intense work with faculty, education institutes, and the Ministry. The funds available to all but the largest posts would now be insufficient for a long-term program that involved so many seminars and meetings. And few posts could now afford printing and distributing 75,000 teacher’s manuals. (An online edition would work, but it's hard to imagine that the years of meetings and seminars -- necessary in a relational society like Korea's -- could be as effective in an online format.)  American Public Diplomacy has become too busy and too light for such transformational work.

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One person has commented on this article so far

Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

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Author: Donald M. Bishop

Discussing Public Diplomacy in Korea

Sunday, November 23rd 2014

Last week I attended a conference on Public Diplomacy in Busan, Korea.  It gathered participants from the Korea Foundation, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the American Embassy and the Korean-American Educational Commission, U.S. Forces Korea, and several leading Korean policy institutes and universities.  Learning of the different and interesting ways they are engaged in Public Diplomacy made for a fascinating conference.  My presentation follows.

Why Public Diplomacy?

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

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