American public diplomacy

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Public Diplomacy's Oral History Interviews

Sunday, July 30th 2017

Public Diplomacy’s Oral History Interviews

 

Donald M. Bishop

 

It’s a commonplace that most historical studies of U.S. public diplomacy have focused on Washington policies, themes, leaders, and decisions. 

 

They have thus slighted how policies were implemented “in the field” -- in other nations, regions, and societies.  There’s not much written on how Public Diplomacy officers at U.S. embassies, consulates, and American centers presented the United States to the people of other societies or how they advanced U.S. policies.

 

Those who want to gain insight into Public Diplomacy as it is implemented overseas will find a valuable resource in the extensive oral history program of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training.  ASDT’s offices are on the Arlington campus of the George Schultz National Foreign Affairs Training Center.  (In the State Department, the NFATC is usually called the Foreign Service Institute, FSI.)

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

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Author: Donald M. Bishop

Public Diplomacy’s 100 Days

Thursday, April 27th 2017

Donald J. Trump employs public diplomacy as much as any President we’ve seen.  Yet his public diplomacy staff has not faced so much uncertainty in decades.

The State Department, supposed leader for the United States outreach to the rest of the world, named a new press spokesperson this week: one of the first political appointees to join Secretary Rex Tillerson.   Secretary Tillerson has placed a highly respected ambassador in charge of the PD apparatus for the time being.  However, broader guidelines going beyond the press briefings are skimpy.

Except for one bold marker.  A budget is the clearest statement of priorities.  On that basis, the White House has expressed little need of public diplomacy.  Its initial budget request called for the elimination of all educational and cultural exchange programs except for the Fulbright exchange of scholars, on top of a 30 percent across-the-board cut in Department resources.

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Joe B. Johnson

Board member

 

Joe B. Johnson consults on government communication and technology after a career in the United States Foreign Service.  He is an instructor for the National Foreign Affairs Training Center, where he teaches strategic planning for public diplomacy.

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Author: Joe Johnson

Quotable: Bruce Wharton on “Post-Truth” international communication

Saturday, March 25th 2017

There are also dangers in accepting a post-truth paradigm. Communicators, experts, and officials may feel overwhelmed and succumb to inaction or, worse, be seduced into adopting “post-truth techniques” that appeal only to emotion and sideline facts or challenging audiences’ beliefs.

 

Headline:     Remarks at Workshop on "Public Diplomacy in a Post-Truth Society"

 

Author:         Ambassador Bruce Wharton, Acting Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

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Author: Donald M. Bishop

You're the PolOff. They attack your president. What do you say?

Monday, January 16th 2017

Congratulations! You’re a State Department political officer with a new assignment. “Hopefulstan” has a history of corruption, but its citizens are eager to democratize, and you have the tools that American foreign service officers have always been able to rely on: a persuasive lecture about the importance of the rule of law, and equally persuasive warnings about how official corruption damages both civil society and foreign investment.

On top of all that, you have the prestige that comes with representing the United States of America, which is known and admired worldwide for advocating those values.

After only a week at your new post, however, you find things are worse than you thought. Hopefulstan’s corruption is widespread at high levels...

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David S. Jackson

David Jackson is a veteran journalist and former U.S. government official with extensive multimedia communications experience in domestic and international markets.

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Author: David S Jackson

Quotable: Public Diplomacy in Secretary Kerry’s “Cabinet Exit Memo”

Saturday, January 7th 2017

"‘The United States is more secure, more respected, and more engaged in the world than we were when President Obama took office eight years ago. We have brought the international community together to confront the most serious challenges we face and to seize the most significant opportunities that will shape our future.’

 

Headline:     Cabinet Exit Memo

 

Author:         Secretary of State John Kerry

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

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