broadcasting

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/html/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Classic Quotable: U.S. Broadcasting during the 1956 Uprising in Hungary (1972)

Monday, April 10th 2017

The Suez crisis, unrest in Poland, and the Hungarian uprising “dominated the international news” in 1956.  This review of U.S. broadcasting at the time noted “in terms of international communications, the most important was the Hungarian uprising.”  The authors counseled that “If policy is unclear, the audience may misperceive it even when operators do not.  Reactions may be harmful to the interests of both the communicator and the receivers.”

 

Article:                  Foreign Policy and Communications During the Hungarian Uprising

Read More

Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

Voice of America at 75

Thursday, February 2nd 2017

"The news may be good for us. The news may be bad. But we shall tell you the truth.”

These words were uttered 75 years ago in the first broadcast by the Voice of America.  They still guide the U.S. Government's flagship foreign media organization in its output, now spanning all the digital media as well as traditional broadcast channels.

Whether you would like to discover the VOA or be reminded of its history, here's a blog post to get you started.

Read More

Joe B. Johnson

Board member

 

Joe B. Johnson consults on government communication and technology after a career in the United States Foreign Service.  He is an instructor for the National Foreign Affairs Training Center, where he teaches strategic planning for public diplomacy.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Joe Johnson

Quotable: Nicholas Cull on expose, engage, and enhance

Thursday, January 19th 2017

The most effective western responses to the challenge of Kremlin media fall across three categories of action: exposure of Russian disinformation, engagement with endangered populations and enhancement of local media.

 

Headline:     Engaging foreign publics in the age of Trump and Putin: Three implications of 2016 for public diplomacy

 

Author:         Nicholas Cull     

Read More

Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

Quotable: Office of Inspector General on U.S. broadcasting to Egypt

Saturday, October 15th 2016

A recent inspection report provided details of how the Voice of America (VOA) Correspondent Cairo Bureau and the Cairo office of the Middle East Broadcasting Networks (MBN) “inform, engage, and connect people around the world in support of freedom and democracy.”

 

Headline:     U.S. International Broadcasting to Egypt

Read More

Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

Quotable: Thomas Boghardt on the KGB’s AIDS disinformation campaign

Sunday, September 18th 2016

“The practice of intelligence differed considerably between East and West during the Cold War. Western intelligence services were most commonly tasked with gathering information, but their Soviet bloc counterparts placed much greater emphasis on deception operations to influence opinions or actions of individuals and governments.

 

“These “active measures” (aktivinyye meropriatia, as the Soviets called them) included manipulation and media control, written and oral disinformation, use of foreign communist parties and front organizations, clandestine radio broadcasting, manipulation of the economy, kidnappings, paramilitary operations, and support of guerrilla groups and terrorist organizations. Under Joseph Stalin, active measures also included political assassinations. The basic goal of Soviet active measures was to weaken the USSR’s opponents — first and foremost the “main enemy” (glavny protivnik), the United States — and to create a favorable environment for advancing Moscow’s views and international objectives worldwide.

 

“This is the story of one such measure — a campaign to implicate the United States in the emergence of the AIDS pandemic that appeared in the early 1980s. The story both illustrates the nature of Soviet and communist bloc disinformation programs and demonstrates the potential long-term consequences.”  [Front abstract]

 

The revived and upgraded use of disinformation by Russia is now an important factor in international affairs.  This article should be part of any basic study of Public Diplomacy, disinformation, and influence.  Understanding in detail how the Soviet Union wielded information during the Cold War helps illuminate the disturbing contemporary trend.    [DMB]

 

Headline:  Operation INFEKTION: Soviet Bloc Intelligence and Its AIDS Disinformation Campaign

 

Subhead:  “Our friends in Moscow call it ‘dezinformatsiya.’  Our enemies in America call it ‘active measures,’ and I, dear friends, call it ‘my favorite pastime.’”  -- Colonel Rolf Wagenbreth, director of Department X (disinformation) of East German foreign intelligence.

Read More

Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

Syndicate content

Stay Connected

Follow the Public Diplomacy Council on Facebook and YouTube and share your opinion about up-to-date issues with us. 

For more public diplomacy events, check out PDAA's website.