Greta Morris

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Public Diplomacy's Oral History Interviews

Sunday, July 30th 2017

Public Diplomacy’s Oral History Interviews

 

Donald M. Bishop

 

It’s a commonplace that most historical studies of U.S. public diplomacy have focused on Washington policies, themes, leaders, and decisions. 

 

They have thus slighted how policies were implemented “in the field” -- in other nations, regions, and societies.  There’s not much written on how Public Diplomacy officers at U.S. embassies, consulates, and American centers presented the United States to the people of other societies or how they advanced U.S. policies.

 

Those who want to gain insight into Public Diplomacy as it is implemented overseas will find a valuable resource in the extensive oral history program of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training.  ASDT’s offices are on the Arlington campus of the George Schultz National Foreign Affairs Training Center.  (In the State Department, the NFATC is usually called the Foreign Service Institute, FSI.)

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

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Author: Donald M. Bishop

Public Diplomacy’s Oral History Interviews

Monday, November 21st 2016

Public Diplomacy’s Oral History Interviews

 

Donald M. Bishop

 

It’s a commonplace that most historical studies of U.S. public diplomacy have focused on Washington policies, themes, leaders, and decisions. 

 

They have thus slighted how policies were implemented “in the field” -- in other nations, regions, and societies.  There’s not much written on how Public Diplomacy officers at U.S. embassies, consulates, and American centers presented the United States to the people of other societies or how they advanced U.S. policies.

 

Those who want to gain insight into Public Diplomacy as it is implemented overseas will find a valuable resource in the extensive oral history program of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training.  ASDT’s offices are on the Arlington campus of the George Schultz National Foreign Affairs Training Center.  (In the State Department, the NFATC is usually called the Foreign Service Institute, FSI.)

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

Three Public Diplomacy Ambassadors Reflect (I)

Sunday, March 16th 2014

Which earlier Public Diplomacy experiences were most useful when you became Ambassador?

This was the first question I posed to a panel of three former U.S. Ambassadors who came into the Foreign Service as Public Diplomacy officers.  The three recently retired Ambassadors were Linda Jewell (Ecuador), Greta Morris (Republic of the Marshall Islands), and Cynthia Efird (Angola).  Their comments on Public Diplomacy’s role in integrating a Mission -- and how Ambassadors must sometimes “push back” from Washington – are striking.

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One person has commented on this article so far

Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

Three Public Diplomacy Ambassadors Reflect (II)

Sunday, March 16th 2014

Did you see PD any differently as Ambassador than you had when you were a PAO?

This was the second question I posed to a panel of three former U.S. Ambassadors who came into the Foreign Service as Public Diplomacy officers.  They were Cynthia Efird (former Ambassador to Angola), Linda Jewell (Ecuador), and Greta Morris (Republic of the Marshall Islands).  Again they emphasized the value of earlier experience in Public Diplomacy.

Read More

Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

Three Public Diplomacy Ambassadors Reflect (III)

Sunday, March 16th 2014

You’ve been both an Ambassador and a PAO, and you worked in Washington.  What’s the right direction for the future of Public Diplomacy?

This was the final question I posed to a panel of three former U.S. Ambassadors who came into the Foreign Service as Public Diplomacy officers.  They were Cynthia Efird (former Ambassador to Angola), Linda Jewell (Ecuador), and Greta Morris (Republic of the Marshall Islands). 

Among their frank comments:  Public Diplomacy must tell its own story, even inside the Department.  Public Diplomacy needs to focus on analysis, not “programs” or “tools.”  Public Diplomacy needs to work more closely with USAID and the military commands.  Developing career paths is critical.  The four years of Entry Level assignments are “killing the cone.” And Public Diplomacy’s senior leaders must be Public Diplomacy officers.

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Donald M. Bishop is the Bren Chair of Strategic Communications at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. 

Mr. Bishop served as a Foreign Service Officer – first in the U.S. Information Agency and then in the Department of State – for 31 years.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, political-military affairs, and East Asia, he attained the rank of Minister-Counselor in the career service.  He was President of the Public Diplomacy Council from 2013 to 2015 and is now a member of the Board of Directors.

...click authors name for more info

Author: Donald M. Bishop

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